Category: Style

Illusions x

It’s a mad old time at the moment – both kids starting new schools, husband working away from home during the week, scaffolding up, decorators in both inside and out. It does mean Bella’s room is finally being decorated – more on that later.  But making the final decisions in consultation with her has meant much pinning on Pinterest. First there’s been finding the line between what she wants now versus what I believe would stand the test of time and take her through her teenage years…an interesting discussion.  But there’s also been a feeling of walking between a real world and an imaginary one and reaching a point where the two seem to collide into a strange reality.  As we’ve both been pinning and sharing inspiration it’s become more and more obvious that what looks good isn’t always practical, and if it isn’t practical, does it deserve it’s title of good? Take the kids room above, an eclectic vision of white pepped with colour and texture.  But the ladder..why?

At first glance this is a minimalists wet dream with toys framed beautifully to catch the eye like tempting abstract art.  Except how can a child reach them? Stand on the rocking chair? Maybe borrow the ladder from the picture above?

Same problem here.  Except don’t you look at all of these and feel sorry for the kids? The toys are so carefully chosen and exceptionally curated, not because they’re fun to play with but because they’ll photograph well, give the right image..this is a sickness that is contagious..

Or else you’ll get the room where there aren’t any toys at all.  Because..well..playing is just so overrated isn’t it? Far better for kids to just to suck it up that they’re going adults and get used to it, perception over substance, pretence over truth, the new modern dream…maybe I need to go and live with the Amish..or not! But embracing what is beautiful and what is practical seems a basic, honest step…

 

Laters, Kate x

Pascale Monovoisin x


I like to think that way back, when the rules of the world were decided, there was a little subsection that was quietly written into stone which read, And for summer there will be a certain type of jewellery that will look and feel right, sing of sunshine, long days and blue skies. These pieces by Pascale Monovoisin belong to that heady group.

Is it the simplicity, the link to nature, the colours? Or is it that summer just makes choosing much easier, freer and organic?

 

Laters, Kate x

Three wishes..

 

And one of them would be to buy a summer dress from Three Graces London...

With a joyous attitude that isn’t afraid of volume, a lightness of touch and a cunning eye for cut, these dresses embody the free, unfettered spirit of summer.

Classic yet modern, these dresses have the ability to move effortless up or down social requirements, from the perfect piece for a day knocking back the Pimms on Centre Court, to a throw-over beach dress for a family holiday.

(All pics Three Graces London)

 

Time to get saving..

Laters, Kate x

Christy Dawn x

Christy Dawn produces indie pin-up pieces beautifully crafted for easy living and barefoot dancing in the golden rays of the Californian sun.

Her clothes are made with deadsotck fabrics – the left over fabrics from other fashion houses who’ve over estimated their needs: smaller supplies means smaller production runs making these dresses eco friendly near-originals handmade in LA.

For the laid back beach babe bride, her bridal section is also well worth checking out for its simple lines, lightness of touch and sheer summer elegance.

(All pics Christy Dawn and Pinterest)

In fact Christy Dawn, with her prices of around $260 for a dress, $800 for a wedding dress is the perfect illustration of quality over quantity, buying less but buying better, her prices truly reflecting the costs involved for a genuine artisan label rather than an omnipotent big name brand with willy waving status issues.

 

Worth a thought.

Laters, Kate x

Phluid x

Clothes are so ubiquitous it’s easy to take them for granted: fripperies, feathers and function. Except they unconsciously say so much – they are our inner identities reflected back to the world.  Those moments when you have nothing to wear? It’s really because there’s nothing to express who you want to be that day.

But what if the freedom we believe in is really a myth? What if society has conditioned our thinking so much we no longer notice the rules, the divisions and the assumptions they lead to?

And there are many of them: Blue for a boy, pink for a girl, pretty dresses for girls that look sweet but don’t take into consideration climbing trees and protection against skinned knees, trousers for boys that metaphorically take on another meaning, T-bars for primary school girls, running shoes for boys, Pedestal high heels for women: the literal presentation of an object of desire: Look sexy, feel sexy they shout. Taxi shoes! We laugh, the truth covered by humour, falling for the fantasy rather than admit they’re restrictive, tortuous and totally lacking function.

What about sizing? It’s another hidden form of segregation: There’s the designer labels who don’t make anything above a size 14 – what’s the message they’re giving?  That only the rich are perfect?  Or that designers only want to hang their clothes on hangers, not real bodies, real people? But we still let them, maybe one day hoping that person will be us, another part of our insidious cultural brainwashing. What about the clothes store that allegedly offer larger sizes except they never have any in stock? Is it because they can’t understand why someone with that body would want to wear it? Is that really their choice to make? When what’s available for one body isn’t available for another it’s limitation, restriction, and control.

Gender is another straitjacket demanding clothing conformity, every store with racks of clothes marked out for one type of person only, the changing rooms following suit.  Who has decided these divisions?

Certainly not PhluidPhluid is the first gender neutral store that’s just opened in New York as a place without judgement or fear where it’s the clothes that do the talking, not our mental labels. Phluid says we have the ability to imagine a world without ‘because we do’ traditions and outdated rituals that don’t work.  They say it’s up to us to open our eyes and fix it: Acceptance, balance, integrity, intention are so much more appealing.

 

(All pics Phluid)

Personally, it’s such a relief to see a store that celebrates what makes us different whilst cherishing what makes us the same: We think choice is freedom, but it only is if that choice is available to everyone.

 

Laters, Kate x

Revelation x

There are many things that science can still not explain so maybe I have died and gone to heaven, such is my delight at discovering the designer and maker of this wallpaper and her treasure trove of work.


Marthe Armitage graduated from Chelsea School of Art after World War 11. Faced with the problem of juggling young children, she started designing and lino-cutting her own wallpapers. After sketching the design she uses the hand-cut lino blacks and a century-old offset lithographic printing press that she has owned for over 40 years to created custom-printed rolls of wallpaper.

Not only does she create an object of desire but a lifestyle, a passion and a calling.

Maybe she’ll adopt me?

(Link here, all pics Pinterest)

 

Before my idol was William Morris, but it’s the seductive meanderings of Marthe’s work that pull at the heart strings and make eyes glow.

 

When my boat comes in, this is the wallpaper that will adorn my walls.

Laters. Kate x

Summer vibes x

 

When the sun comes out, life pauses.

 

Maybe that’s why these chairs from Lemonmade appeal.

Midway between trad and modern.

And somewhere to kick back and smell the roses.

(All pics Lemonmade)

There can be great riches in small moments.

Laters, Kate x