Tagged: Interiors

Light up x

Northern Lighting, an international company based in Oslo, describe themselves as a creative force led by original ideas, in a place where traditional design seems like a thing of the past. Interesting.

Certainly each light is different and beguiling..

(All pics Northern Lighting)

This has to be the perfect corridor light.  It just wants to sit on a long, thin piece of foxed glass.  Heaven.

 

Laters, Kate x

The Simple Things x

Escapism confined to the mists of time, summed up in the romanticism of a gypsy caravan.

Away from the knowledge of leaky roofs, bumpy rides and social exclusion, it’s the pastime equivalent of the tiny house movement.

On my dream list is the wish to spend some serious time in one – Just. To. See

Laters, Kate x

Old tricks x

We should be in Greece now where one thing that is fundamentally different from the UK (apart from sun, sea, beach, food, music..life) is the bathrooms and in particular shower/trays walls which are made on site, in one piece away from any notions of hinges, doors and glass and their battle with limescale.

A similar effect can be made using Tadelakt – or Moroccan plaster, now making it’s presence felt over here.

The joy is it’s versatility – waterproof, flexible, able to create curves or lines it’s totally usable.

This is about embracing forms beyond and one for the mental storage box.

Laters, Kate x

Project concrete x

There was a project this half term – to make fairy light stands for the garden, just like these ones.

The aim was to have pure concrete at the bottom rather than a container of any sort.  I found these 7 litre tubs in the pound shop and hoped the flex on the sides would mean the hardened concrete would pull out easily.  The easiest way to mix the concrete was separately, in each tub.  Tip of the day: mix it in layers rather than all at once – put a bit in, add water, mix…add a bit more, otherwise it hard work..and there’s always a bit you’ve missed..otherwise, I didn’t know how easy concrete playing was. Like play doh for grown ups..

The concrete was nothing posh.  Bog standard from DIY store.

I had six foot metal poles from homebase (£4.75 each) to go in the middle, held in place with duct tape till they were hardened.

It was surprisingly easy to pull the finished bases out. Ta-dah!

I bought s-hooks from Amazon.  The shape of this particular hook was appealing with it’s straight side to fit in the pole and the curvy end to hold the lights.

In position..pic taken today as the rain streams down…the hooks are held in position with window putty. Simple.

The final thing will be to paint them all black – when the weather improves.  And then photograph them with their lights. Maybe then I’ll do a post on finished projects because the mirror has finally gone up in the downstairs toilet too….

 

Laters, Kate x

Lighten the mood x

The plan for the garden light poles is well under way.  The pound shop proved to be a rich source of materials, as did our local DIY store.  So far I have £1 trugs for the bases, £4 two metre black poles, 2 bags of cement and some ‘s’ hooks ordered online (I’m hoping they’ll be the perfect shape for one end to sit in the pole, the other to hold the lights.  We’ll see).  The powers that be have promised summer will return this week, so hopefully it will be a gentle evenings activity putting it all together. Until then, enjoy these interior nods to summer where light and natural wood evoke thoughts of sunbeams and curled cats.

 

(All pics Pinterest)

Laters, Kate x

Light touch x

Light mood, sunny day, perfect design.

Made with the absence of hype.

And silence is such a rare commodity.

(All pics Atelier Areti)

But these lights don’t need the bluster.

Enjoy.

Laters, Kate x

Brickwork x

So I’ve found this App called ‘Paint my place’ – it’s not the most intuitive app and there’s no point in going for the free version, it’s £2.99 or nothing.  But it has allowed me to take a picture of the front of our house and play around with different colours on the brick work.

This is off-black from Farrow and Ball. Probably a bit too gothic..

Pic no.2  – I was curious to see what a really dark blue would look like as an exterior paint. Not my favourite. What I learnt is not to go for the colours you know, but choose via the sample square on the app, that way you can see if you like the potential colour rather than the specific colour.

The version using Farrow and Ball downpipe. The softer dark is better.

Neutrals – this is Skimming Stone by Farrow and Ball – which probably proves the point of colour distortion: Don’t rely on what it says if you’re going to buy paint based on this app.

And finally – Elephant’s breath, Farrow and Ball.

It’s been interesting and fun to to have a genuine chance to experiment. I think it has proved previous posts conclusions: Downpipe is an easy choice because it will work.  To find the right neutral will be much harder, but I’m surprised how much I like the neutrals.

My admiration for Hockney and his skill with ipad art has now shot sky high.

Laters, Kate x

Front door x

After 14 years of council-style reinforced glass the front door finally got it’s makeover on Friday.

The before picture! Complete with piece of paper stuck on with door number scribbled on it.  Attractive.

The finished design by Nikki  (click for her details) was beautifully based on the doors we have between the kitchen/diner and the sitting room.

 

The result is a delight, especially when the sun pours through and creates rainbows on the walls.

Above we’ve gone for simplicity of plain glass and the number to let in as much light as possible.

The added bonus was that Keith-the-amazing-stained-glass-man turned up in his pre-war Singer car! How supper cool?

A charming success in every way!

Laters, Kate x

Outside Story x

This summer it will be fourteen years since the outside of house was painted.  I know the date exactly because it was the year we got Molly the dog.  Which means everythings getting a bit old.  But at least the outside can be re-painted..although I’d prefer not to paint it white..at one point I thought a beige putty colour would be the way to go..but finding the right putty colour has proved very hard as so many have too much green in their base.  Now I’m thinking it’s the chance of a lifetime to go rad, be bad..and go dark..

Particularly when you see photos like this: It’s hard to standout against such beautiful period houses but this modern number effortlessly makes its mark.

Ours is a Victorian redbrick house not dissimilar to this one.  Whilst the colours compliment, on a personal level I think an off-black would work better…

Maybe more like this. But is that just opting out??

I think I might takes some pictures of our facade and start colouring in…there must be some technology out there now to help make the decision? Watch this space.

 

Laters, Kate x