Tagged: Craft

Update x

The crochet is going great guns, particularly as we’ve come up with the perfect project to encourage repetition, practise and ideal tension: We’re making what can only be called ‘little socks’ for my dining rooms chairs to replace those sticky pads that only work to gather dog hair.

We did experiment with a garden string and twine, but for ease of make we’re going with a thick grey wool, though we’re both anxious about longevity – time will tell.

It also helps that the six chairs round the table are back with their newly woven seating, looking enticing.

So that’s only seven chairs and twenty eight more socks to go..

Laters, Kate x

Wiser x

 

It’s going to be some time before my fingers can instinctively do this, but I’m having my first ever crochet lesson today and my eyes can’t wait.

 

They’ve been checking out all the incredible designs a simple hook and a piece of yarn and a little bit of yearn can make.

 

I’m very lucky – I’m learning from a highly skilled older lady in my neighbourhood courtesy of The Wiser Collective, a group set up by local mums Claire Redway and Sarah Laffey which aims to link up the generations in my area and

  1. offer practical support for families living apart from their relatives
  2. build connections and provide purpose for potentially isolated older people
  3. offer a sense of neighbourly community and companionship for both groups.

It works on the idea that there is so much we can learn from a group that all too often find themselves isolated, and there are things that as busy families we can offer – large meals with laughter can be something we take for granted.

 

(All pics Pinterest)

I can’t wait

Laters, Kate x

Random x

Why have something full sized when you can have it in miniature?? Random but true – these edible delights were spotted on Pinterest…but the mind blowing bit is they are all made out of the humble pipe cleaner!

Feel like making one yourself and the web is full of brilliant tutorials like this one.

It’s like balloon art without the effort

(All pics Pinterest)

 

I want!

Laters, Kate x

Majeda Clarke x

Part of the surprise of life is what captures the eye and why; I suspect there was an unconscious element of appeal for writing this post – I’ve just finished Circe by Madeline Miller, a book grounded in the love of the Greek myths and gilded in gold.  Circe has her own loom, made by the legendary Daedalus from sweet smelling cedar, a combination to delight the senses even in the imagination. Majeda Clarke is also a weaver of magic, she says ‘There is something abut the act of making cloth by hand that connects me to a long line of weavers through history who have sat in from of a loom.  It is an ancient tradition that is vanishing in a world of mass production and manufactured perfection.’ Her textiles are a celebration of colour, craft and creation.

Majeda also weaves delicate, cobweb like muslins.

(All pics Majeda Clarke and Pinterest)

Objects to lust after, save for and appreciate.

Laters, Kate x

Synchronise Watches..

Charlie has a joint eighth ‘survival’ birthday on the Common tomorrow (I’ll be doing my sun dance once I’ve written this) (and stocking up on paracetamol/large flagons of alcohol).  I saw these army characters in Poundland and thought candle holders!

It could all go horribly wrong – I couldn’t find my glue gun this morning so have resorted to carpet glue which promises to glue plastic if you leave it to cure long enough….

We’ll see…..

Laters, Kate x

Ikat x

The word ‘ikat’ derives from the Malay-Indonesian word ‘mengikat’ which translates as to tie or bind.

The creative process is an oxymoron where the finished result is a blurred image but the techniques are complex requiring tying, dyeing, untying, re-tying and dying again of the multiple threads in precise colours and positions.

The finished work is fluid, vibrant and capture a certain spirit.

(All pictures Pinterest)

Colourful shadows in a neon-lit world.

Laters, Kate x

Wood Craft x

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It’s half term so we’ve been busy doing very little.  One thing we have achieved is a bit of stick weaving…a strangely satisfying art form…first you need to find a good selection on Y-shaped sticks = outside jaunt.

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Then wrap each side of the Y.

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To do this you tie the string on, then create a loop at the back.

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Then bring the other end through the loop and pull tight.

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Continue till both sides are done.

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We measured two arm lengths of string for the next bit.  (This is Bella doing her Christ the Redeemer impression)

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Using a large darning needle (new it would come in useful) weave between the two sides to create the horizontal lines.

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Ta-dah!

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Finally weave wool in V shapes vertically from one side to the next. This is Bella’s finished creation.

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Being an adult, I wanted mine tighter…therefore it’s still a work in progress…

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Surprisingly satisfying.

Laters, Kate x

Brainstop..

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So the husband asked me what sort of doorstop I’d like for the new crittall doors – I said a round one of course!

He looked at me like I’d suddenly grown donkey ears but it’s not such a stupid idea…the inspiration came from cannon ball doorstop at my parent’s house in Greece: heavy enough for purpose but round enough for cheeky aesthetic pleasure. So he searched the internet and found this, a cannonball doorstop handmade in Dorset by Sam at Millin Metalcraft and I couldn’t be more delighted!

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Sam makes them in three sizes – from heavy (£25), to even heavier (£35)…to very heavy (£45) (which is strong enough to hold back a barn door..)

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And they are all that you could want: resonance, authenticity and practicality.

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But Sam’s talents don’t stop there – he does a beautiful line in metal sculptures like these alliums…

 

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And is up to be challenged for anything metal related. Minion stove anyone?

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Ours in situ. Made by hand by a proper, loving, skilled craftsman  – it’s simple, effective joy.

Laters, Kate x

Lavenders Blue x

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Strange things flit through my head – take today –  lavender bags? Maybe because a kilo of dried lavender has arrived through the post..an impulsive purchase made with thoughts of a tidy, old fashioned style utility room with crisp white linens adorning the shelves.

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But it would be a lovely project to do with the kids..and a great way to use up dying but much loved scraps of vintage fabric.

 

Shame it’s only Monday.

Laters, Kate x

Dog Wool..

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Can love ever be too much or am I just too westernised? I spotted an article on DogWool on the plane on the way back from Greece – apparently there’s a little place in Brittany between Abercerac’h and the Virgin Island lighthouse that will use a traditional spinning wheel, to spin your dogs unwanted hair into balls of wool ready to knit.

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Which is nothing if not honest recycling: It’s something Eskimos have done for centuries using Husky hair as the perfect property against the cold.  In northern Russia they knit socks of dog wool to prevent rheumatism…

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But here? Now?? Maybe my worry is that we don’t live in an extreme cold environment where fingers drop off if they’re not covered appropriately and – lets be honest – this further blurs the line between dog and owner – we already know how many morph to look like each other and now, through this they can genuinely can be a human in dogs clothing.

And what happens when your dog dies??

 

If this is your thing, then by all means go for it – there’s certainly a high level of skill involved…personally, I’ve never met a dog I didn’t like…sadly I can’t say the same for knitwear..Molly, you’re safe.

 

Laters, Kate x