Tagged: essential oils

Light my way x

 

I’m not here. I’m in a car, driving to Bristol, genuinely quite excited about experiencing a motorway again and moving wider than a 2 mile circle from the house.  We’re emptying The Husband’s work flat as he’s going to be in London till at least Christmas; Every cloud. The plan is to make a round trip in a day – normally a ticket to hell, but all of that has been subtly reframed by the thought of travelling at speed, the prospect of a horizon and the promise of new vistas.  Aren’t I the lucky one? These pictures were taken today – Sunday afternoon has become a potter time for me – projects to plan, things to do.  And this represents the first time I’ve tried to re-make candles.

 

 

The first thing was to get rid of the bits of wax left at the end of all the finished candles.  I found the best way was to pour in boiling water, which melted the wax, making it rise to the surface to create a wax plug that was then easy to remove.

 

 

My eclectic collection of containers, from tins to pots to old candle jars.

 

 

The wicks I ordered very cheaply from Ebay.

 

 

And stuck down with a dab of glue from a handy glue gun.

 

 

This was the super candle that inspired the re-make – a winter candle from the White Company with it’s gorgeous smell that died leaving lots of wax.  I melted down in a pyrex bowl over a saucepan of boiling water.  Once the lump of it became soft, I cut it up into smaller bits to speed up the melt.  I also added all the remnants of the other candles, because why not? Once everythings melted it’s possible to add various essential oils.  As the kitchen already smelt like a tart’s boudoir, I refrained.

 

 

Pouring in the liquid wax is not the easiest thing. I recommend a funnel.  Then I improvised with tin foil to keep the wicks upright and central.

 

 

Highly satisfying and highly recommended.

Laters, Kate x

Small steps..

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This weekend marks the start of moving towards a less wasteful life as inspired by this post.  For me, it’s not about wearing a horsehair shirt but finding simple solutions that work and moving away from the total belief in mass produced, mass marketed products we pick up without thinking.  The first experiment neatly fits in with my own eco philosophy – it involves dryer sheets – which to many would be an environmental oxymoron, but as a dryer works for us as a family it stays – and the spotlight goes onto what goes into the dryer..

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From my research, there seem to be two basic methods – the first involves using ready made (you could make your own..there are recipes..(I’m not there yet)) fabric conditioner. Strips of old towels or sponges are soaked in the solution and then are used either wet, straight from the pot or can be dried before hand.

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(All pics Pinterest and View from the Fridge)

The next method requires a larger leap of faith…the cloths are stored and left soaking in a mixture of vinegar and essential oils (any combination you fancy).  They say, when the clothes come out, any smell of fish and chips has evaporated away…

 

The kids could be grateful it’s half term next week…

Laters, Kate x